HOME > FAQ's in the prenatal-postpartum

FAQ's in the prenatal-postpartum

Q: Can you introduce me to a Japanese speaking pediatrician?

【Japanese speaking pediatricians in South Bay】
.......................................................................................................................................
Dr. Elliot Sumi
Dr. David Inouye
Dr. Katherine Inouye

Contact:
South Bay Nikei Pediatric Medical group
3440 Lomita Blvd #144 Torrance CA 90505
Tel:310-326-3396
.......................................................................................................................................
Dr. Naoko Matsumoto
連絡先:
Naoko Matsumoto, M.D., Inc.
3440 Lomita Blvd. Suite 321, Torrance, CA 90505
Tel:(310) 483-7880
Official Website

Q: When should I go to the hospital?

If this is your first baby, you should go to the hospital when your contractions are 5 minutes apart, and if this is your second baby, 7 minutes apart. Also, if there is excessive vaginal bleeding, sharp, persistent abdominal pain, or your water breaks, please go to the hospital.

Q: How are the hospitals in the U.S.? (such as the delivery room and hospital rooms)

In Japan, the rooms are specifically divided into labor room, delivery room, hospital room, etc; however, in the U.S., you will be staying in the same room from the time of hospitalization to delivery. After delivery, some hospitals allow you to change rooms, but others require you stay in the same room until discharge.

Q: Please tell me the length of hospitalization in U.S.

For vaginal birth, including the day of delivery, 2 days and 1 night (48 hours).
For cesarean section, including the day of delivery, 4 days and 3 nights (96 hours).
However, because it may be different depending on your insurance plan, please make sure to call your insurance company to check.

Q: Should I get a Tdap vaccine (Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis)? Should my husband and parents who are visiting from Japan also get a vaccine? Where can I get it?

In the U.S., it is recommended that pregnant women get a Tdap vaccine. Your parents who are visiting from Japan don't necessarily have to get a vaccine; however, your husband should get a vaccine so your baby doesn't get Pertussis. You can get it at a pharmacy. Otherwise, please ask your doctor.
https://www.cdc.gov/pertussis/pregnant/mom/get-vaccinated.html

Q: Is it common to take vitamin pills in the U.S.; is it okay to take Prenatal Vitamin (vitamin pills for pregnant women)?

It is alright to take vitamin pills prescribed from your doctor before or after labor. Vitamin pills for pregnant women contain omega 3, DHA, EPA, vitamin C, D, E, B, calcium, Folic Acid, iron, etc.

Q: I've heard that in the U.S., babies don't get bathed after birth...

Yes. Until the baby's cord falls off (10 days-2 weeks), the most commonly used method is a sponge bath, where you wipe your baby's body with a wet towel. If there is poop on your baby's bottom, you may also wash him/her in the tub.

Q: Should I disinfect my baby's cord?

In the U.S., it is common not to disinfect the baby's cord with alcohol, and most people don't do anything in particular until the cord naturally falls off. If there is red swelling, pus, foul odor, or excessive bleeding present, please contact your pediatrician. The cord should naturally fall off within 10-14 days. The small amount of bleeding that is present before the cord falls off is normal. Until the cord falls off, please put on the diaper so that it doesn't touch the cord.

Q: Should I have my baby circumcised?

Due to religious reasons, some people have circumcision on their babies; however, the AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics) states that circumcision isn't medically mandatory. Couples should have a discussion as to whether they should have circumcision on their baby.

Q: I've heard that the types of shots are different in the U.S. and Japan.

Yes, they are slightly different. First, the baby will receive his/her first hepatitis B vaccine in the hospital he/she was born at. If you will be returning to Japan soon, it is not required; however, if you are planning to enroll in a school in the U.S., it is required. Please receive the remaining two shots at a pediatric clinic. They are done upon the parents' consent.
There are other vaccinations that are different from those in Japan, so ask you your pediatrician for more details. The vaccination schedule may vary slightly depending on the pediatrician.

Q: Are there any other shots that are not in Japan required?

Yes. Your baby will receive a vitamin K shot immediately after birth. This is to prevent intracranial hemorrhage due to vitamin K deficiency. Vitamin K syrup is common in Japan, but in the U.S., shots are common. Every baby will receive this shot.

▲Return to TOP